Description: Who Pays for PFAS Contamination?
In early 2020, California, for example, set its own regulatory limits for certain PFAS compounds in drinking water. Specifically, California set response levels of 10 ppt for PFOA and 40 ppt for PFOS, based on the average concentration of each constituent measured across four quarterly samples at a drinking water source. Previous response levels had been 70 ppt for PFOA and PFOS combined,...
PublisherWater Environment Federation
Word count289
Description: Who Pays for PFAS Contamination?
PFOA and PFOS are part of the PFAS family of about 6,000 chemicals used in fire retardants, as well as stain-, water-, and grease-resistant products. These compounds were created in the 1930s, and beginning soon after, they were made for use in products such as hiking boots, rainwear, swimwear, cookware, and disposable food wrappings. Within the U.S., PFOS was exclusively manufactured by the 3M...
PublisherWater Environment Federation
Word count127
Description: Who Pays for PFAS Contamination?
Concerns about the effect of PFOA and PFOS on human health arose decades ago. The U.S. EPA found traces of the chemicals in human tissue samples being collected since the 1970s. However, it is only over the last 20 years or so that regulators have started to become aware of the hazards of these substances. Researchers have found potential links between the chemicals and a variety of adverse human...
PublisherWater Environment Federation
Word count100
Description: Who Pays for PFAS Contamination?
PFOS and PFOA may enter drinking water supplies when products made with the substances are disposed of in landfills or when residues from household use of those products (e.g., washing PFAS-containing cookware or clothing) end up in wastewater. These PFOS and PFOA concentrations can then be carried through landfill leachate, wastewater discharge, or water resource recovery facilities into...
PublisherWater Environment Federation
Word count156
Description: Who Pays for PFAS Contamination?
There is evidence that the manufacturers of PFOA and PFOS knew that they caused harm when used as intended but did not warn consumers of the risk. For example, internal documents from 3M that have been disclosed in lawsuits against the company show that, as early as 1960, 3M knew that PFAS disposed in landfills would eventually reach groundwater supplies, and that, as early as 1976, 3M was...
PublisherWater Environment Federation
Word count573
Description: Who Pays for PFAS Contamination?
In addition to protecting your water system’s financial resources, pursuing legal action against the manufacturers now is one way to demonstrate to your ratepayers and community that you are taking action to keep the community safe and recoup costs outside of raising rates. Being among the first to act also ensures that your lawsuit is scheduled into busy court dockets as early as possible....
PublisherWater Environment Federation
Word count198
Description: Who Pays for PFAS Contamination?
Systems that have detected PFAS in any of their sources should consult with legal counsel as soon as possible to explore recourse that protects its rights and those of its ratepayers to pursue the costs of any treatment against the manufacturers who are responsible, and to ensure that they can take legal action in a timely manner.
PublisherWater Environment Federation
Word count110